There are 10 interesting facts I have included in this post.  Some of these facts will be remembered, but some people may not remember these 10 facts.  They are interesting because Levi Strauss, the man himself was a creative genius.  We are thankful for both Strauss and Davis: otherwise, we may be wearing silk jeans®–  blue silk jeans®.

Blue silk material that could have been made for jeans

Levi Strauss used innovation to build his product to what it is today: a worldwide business enterprise.  We must not forget Jacob Davis, the man who invented the blue jeans.

smiles on a bench

Ten Interesting facts about denim jeans®.

“Happiness is love and blue jeans.”

Many people believe jeans were an American Invention and I thought so too but they were first found or got their start in Genoa, Italy.  It was a harbor town that made a certain type of material called a gene or jean.

The name “denim” derives from French serge de Nîmes, meaning ‘serge from Nîmes‘. a fabric which originated in Nemes, France during the Middle Ages.

The contemporary use of the word “jeans” comes from the French word for GenoaItaly (Gênes), where the first denim trousers were made.

Later after the Italians exported the material throughout Europe, the weavers tried to develop the jeans and were known as “serge de Nemes” meaning from the city of Nemes which was later referred to as denim. 

Levi Strauss story for Johnnie    In Nemes, Genoa, Italy the weavers developed a twill fabric that came to be known as ‘denim’. 

Wikipedia contributors. “Denim.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 Apr. 2018. Web. 18 Apr. 2018.

“The best thing to hold onto life is each other.”   Aubrey Hepburn

What is denim?
According to Wikipedia, “Denim is a sturdy cotton warp-faced textile in which the weft passes under two or more warp threads. This twill weaving produces a diagonal ribbing that distinguishes it from cotton duck.”

What is Cotton Duck?

Cotton duck is a heavy, plain woven cotton fabric, Duck canvas is more tightly woven than plain canvas.

Duck fabric is woven with two yarns together in the warp and a single yarn in the weft

Cotton duck is used in a wide range of applications, from sneakers to painting canvases to tents to sandbags.

Duck fabric is woven with two yarns together in the warp and a single yarn in the weft.

Wikipedia contributors. “Denim.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 Apr. 2018. Web. 18 Apr. 2018.

 

Now, we see another 501 Jean commercial named, Pick Up.  1989   Music, “Be My Baby” by the Ronnetts.

 

 

“Denim is a love that never fades.”   Elio Fiorucci

I heard Brat Pitt also wore 501® Levi® Jeans, but I do not have the facts about that.  

Is there anyone who can inform me?  

I was searching for some Youtube videos and got a short video trailer from a scene with Brad Pitt.  

Maybe he was to emulate the great James Dean.  This video clip is a Levi® Jeans® commercial made before Brad Pitt became famous. 

Brad had the great looks and talent and wealth.  Now sadly his mind is on his divorce.  However, this commercial makes him a woman’s dream.

 

” Born with good jeans” –Pinterest

Here is an interesting partial list of well know people who have or still wear 501® Levi® jeans.  To see their pictures and short takes, see Fashion Telegraph.  (The older Version)  

Did this film about Brad Pitt remind you of James Dean who always wore his 501® Levi® jeans?  It is a good thing Brad’s girlfriend brought him his Levi® jeans.  

How did she know he was getting out of prison?  Well, we don’s ask such questions if it is a Brad Pitt movie. 

Marlon Brando; Ronan Keating wore 501®s for the Capital FM”S party in the Park in 2001.  Bruce Springsteen wore them on tour in 1985.  Mitt Romney, presidential hopeful wore the classic fit in March 2012;  

Barack Obama who threw the first pitch for the St. Louis Cardinals wore them there.  Geoge Clooney wears the classic fit with a leather jacket!    

Steve Jobs wears his iconic uniform with his 501 ®s and a black turtleneck sweater for his Apple Products.  Alexa Chung wears cut-offs from 501® Levis®;   Chloe  Sevigny usually wears vintage stone-washed 501® cut-offs.        

Edward Furlong,  Clay Aiken,  Sheryl Crow and Drew Barrymore wear Levi® jeans®.

 

 

“I’ll never throw away my blue jeans.” –Susan Ford–

After leaving New York at the age of 23, Levi set sail for San Francisco with his brother-in-law and opened a wholesale business dealing in dry goods and selling such items as clothes, boots, cloth, needles, and thread,

But during the gold rush era, there were prospectors and miners that were the tools needed for them to work with; such as shovels, pickaxes, pans, clothing,  and tents.

Levi was 24 years old when he sailed from Manhattan around the Cape Horn to San Francisco in 1853.  His purpose was to open a dry goods store for the minors.  He established a branch for his brothers. 

Over the next 20 years, he built a name for himself.   He was a well-respected businessman.  He was a philanthropist.

Strauss also gave money to several charities, including special funds for orphans.

Using a series of different locations in the city over the years, he sold clothing, fabric, and other items to small shops in the region.

A special event occurred that would change everyone and everything.      Now for the video “Parting”! 1987.  Music, “When a Man Loves a Woman” by Percy Sledge.

 

 

“You can never own too many jeans.”

I liked this commercial advertising  Coca-Cola Coke.   I remembered seeing this and here’s my chance to show it now.  It is not really about denim jeans entirely, but you can use your imagination in this type of commercial.  My dad’s mule who drank coca-cola drinks from a coke bottle reminds me of this commercial.  Our coke machine was on the porch of the curio shop and every time a tourist was near the coke machine, he would bray loudly.  This was in the late 1950’s. The mule entertained many tourists, but he mostly entertained the family with his antics.  I hope this commercial put a smile on you too.

 

Food, water, denim.   Let’s get back to essentials.”

Jeans were later inspired by a customer whose pants kept ripping.   Jacob Davis was the man who helped the customer by adding rivets to his pants.  Jacob Davis was a tailor in Nevada.  He ordered the denim material from Levi Strauss in San Francisco.

The customer asked Davis to make a pair of pants for her husband that would not fall apart.  Davis came up with the idea of using metal rivets on the points of strain.  So he put the rivets on the pocket corners and at the base of the button-fly.

It was a new idea, so to get the rivets patented he called on Levi Strauss to help the patient and to become business partners, and since Davis was wanting to protect his idea of the rivets (who by the way solved the customer’s problem) convinced Levi Strauss, a merchant owner of a dry goods store to become the business partner.  

                                          

“No matter how hard it gets, let’s just be happy that today is Friday, payday, and we are allowed to wear jeans at the office.”

Levi Strauss went on to San Francisco and manufactured the sturdy work pants of miners and hard-working factory workers.  The first to benefit was the minors.  They needed sturdy pants in the mines.  Later, when Levi Strauss used the rivets in the pants, the miners were happy that the pockets were reinforced for things they had to put the different things in them.

He went on to make jeans for the woodcutters, farmers, and cowboys.  Levi had the reputation of making a sturdy pair of pants.  Today, Levi Strauss and Company still have the sturdy pair of 501 Levi original and tall & big original fit jeans for men.  Women wear them too.

    

“An expert knows all the right answers if the right questions are given to him.”

After World War II, jeans became very popular with the people in Europe.  American GI’s would wear then off duty in Paris.   (later other countries were informed about the jeans)

It became a fashion item at that time.  A kiss was okay, but jeans were great and many women and women wanted a pair.

This video commercial is by Nick Kidman.  Music, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye.

 “When in doubt, wear jeans.”

Jeans were once banned in certain settings.  It used to be that coveralls, before 1950, were used by workers.

But after 1950, teens called them jeans and they became popular among the younger generation.   But they were banned at certain places such as schools, movie theaters, and restaurants because they were seen as a form of rebellion against conformity.

Now, everyone wears jeans from the rich men to the salesperson to the movie director to Presidents.  You go anywhere and see all kinds of people wear 501 Levi original fit jeans.  (tall and big sizes too.)

This 501 commercial is based on a movie in the 1960’s (I think) called, “Swimmer”.  This Levi® commercial is called, “swimmer”, in 1991.  Directed by Tarsem at Spots Films.  Music, “Mad About The Boy” by Dinah Washington.

Denim has always been an everyday symbol for the style.”    Ritu Kuman

 “I want to die with my blue jeans on.”-Andy Warhol–

Since the teenager went to the movies with their dates, friends, and family, of course, Hollywood got into it and used that symbol of rebellion in several movies.

The most noted was James Dean in “Rebel Without a Cause.”

Marlon Brando also was seen in a movie as a rebellious motorcycle gang member who wore the symbolic rebel jeans and the real leather jacket.

That made the jeans even more popular.  Many actors have played roles while wearing their Levi® jeans.  James Dean was an icon for fashion cool.  His role in Giant was a short part, but one that was remembered by all.

              

This video was from a television commercial advertising (I had thought) the 1984 Olympic Games.  It is a catchy tune remembered by many people.   Listen to the times of TV advertising; to name a few.  It is too bad I do not remember this commercial and was pleased to hear it now.

 

“I want to die with my blue jeans on.”-Andy Warhol–

Levi Strauss & Co. has used clever entertaining and creative advertisements since the early beginning.

The first one was by word of mouth probably, since his jeans were very sturdy for the minors and Levi was an honest man.  In fact, many times you would see Levi Strauss walking around the various people who needed sturdy jeans,   It is probably a good guess they knew him and asked him questions.   He was an up-close advertiser and at his small company knew the names of all his employees and he talked with them.  He was not able to do this when his company became large, however.

Having no wife, Levi was able to devote all his time working at his company.  He expected his employees to work hard too and they did.

This was during the years when a handshake between two businessmen, sealed an unwritten contract.  He may not have wanted to wear his own product, but I have an idea that he would have loved to drink a 10 cent coke.    He worked hard to bring a sturdy Levi® jean for those minors and the farmers.

 

refreshing to drink a coke

So I guess this is a note to end on for one of Levi Strauss images of an old coca cola posters.    I will now sing this to you.  (music plays and Judy sings)

 “I hope you all enjoyed these advertisements and will hum this tune whenever you may feel down because remember, the song’s words say,  Everyone has a story and that makes your story and your day important.”

Please, just write a short comment or you can ask a question.   Let me know if perhaps you may have a favorite “old” TV commercial you remember.                                             Very good reading

If you have the time, please comment about this story.  Thanks again.  Your views are important to me.  I had fun and I hope you did too,  My best!  Judy

If you would like to purchase anything from Amazon, check my Accessories page or the “501® jeans® orders with links.”  Some of my stories will have surprises that you may be interested in purchasing.  Many are not expensive.

Thanks for reading my Website Stories.

 

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